Myths, Mayhem and Money: The Truth About the Child Talent Industry – Part 2

Part 2: Briefs, Clients & No Guarantees 

Maya - on set of the Barbie shoot

The opportunity to be a part of the entertainment industry can be a fun and rewarding experience for everyone involved. However, as any good and reputable child talent agency will tell you, we cannot guarantee work.

Yes, you read that correctly, we cannot promise anything. We will never know whether a child will get dozens of opportunities, or just one. In some cases, unfortunately we will have talent that will not come across any work during their representation.

This is because the role of a talent agency is to act as the middle man between the brand/client and the talent. We do not create the ‘work’, nor do we know which talent the client will prefer or select for their campaigns.

 

“We do not guarantee work simply because we are not the decision makers in this process.”

 

So here is how it works from our side. The client will let us know, through a brief, what kind of child they specifically need or want for their shoot. Which is why we can never predict when your child’s age, gender or ethnicity will come through in a brief from a client. Each brief will have a different requirement for the agency to meet, for example; ‘We are looking for a Size 2 girl with Brown Hair’ or ’10-12-year-old boys, who are strong swimmers’. Once we have these details, we scour through our talent and ensure we submit all children who are suitable. So if your child doesn’t meet the brief requirements, we cannot submit them for that particular role or campaign.

The client will make the final decision and we cannot predict nor change this eventual outcome, so remember to keep this in mind if your child is a part of the industry or you are considering entering the industry.

Our dedicated casting department undertake many tasks as the ‘middle man’ in this process. They build and maintain our impressive client base, established over the years to also include a regular client base; who consistently use our agency to search for talent for their upcoming projects. They also submit all of our wonderful talent to all briefs that come thorough.

Zaid World Vision

Suitable briefs are always subject to the client’s needs and once again we aren’t able to foresee what work will come in over the 12 months of your child’s representation. The one thing we do guarantee is that your child will be submitted for all briefs the are suitable for throughout their time with us.

We are lastly the communication between yourself and the client to ensure everything runs smoothly and all legal guidelines are followed (Check out look at Part 1 of The Truth about the Child Talent Industry series to find out about the legal side of the Industry)

It is also important to remember that we will always provide you with as much information as possible, so if you are joining our agency, or any talent agency, be sure to thoroughly read all information provided to you. This can be an easy way to ensure that you understand everything and are prepared for anything the industry throws your way! Remember we are just as excited as you to watch your little star shine!

Myths, Mayhem and Money: The Truth About the Child Talent Industry – Part 1

Many myths surround the child talent industry and child talent/modelling agencies alike.

As the leading agency in the Australian child talent space, we are here to let you know what it’s really like.

The industry in itself can be very fast-paced, with clients organising shoots and castings with only a day’s notice, so expecting these kinds of situations is crucial. We understand that you won’t always be available on short notice but it’s a situation you may come across and it is important to align your expectations to the industry. While fast – paced, the child employment space is also extremely regulated, as any area involving children should be.

And ultimately this is why having an agent is so important, to ensure that everything is done right.

Part 1: What Is Legal?

IMG_2807

Recently SBS program ‘The Feed’ aired the documentary, ‘Breaking the Model’ on the experiences of some young people working for well-known adult modelling agencies in Australia.

While there are issues in every industry, the adult modelling world is extremely different to, and not a reflection of the child talent agencies and the child modelling world.

During the program and in countless media articles following, some of the reported information was incorrect regarding the necessary legal requirements that talent and modelling agencies must follow when sourcing work for children, specifically in NSW.

Contrary to comments made in the program; performer representatives (also known as Talent Agencies) do not need to register themselves as an employer of children with the Office of the Children’s Guardian (NSW), or similar organisations in other states. While that may seem strange, the agencies are not the employers of any children; we as the agent are only – the “middle-man” between the child and the employer. The ‘Employer’ is defined as “the brand or company that has booked the child for a shoot, will be instructing them to perform tasks on set and will ultimately be paying them for work, via the agency”

This means that there is no legal obligation for any agency to register, as they are just the representatives of the talent.

Regardless of this, representatives of child performers do have other legal obligations they must meet. Agencies must ensure that anyone who wishes to employs their talent, is registered with the relevant organisation and can provide the required documentation to prove they have meet the correct legal restrictions.

For example, if your child does a catalogue shoot or a TV Commercial for Target, we will ensure that Target are following all the proper guidelines to be employing children, such as being registered with the correct organisations, no matter the state.

It is also mandatory that your child is supervised on set at all times by a parent or chaperone nominated by the parent. If they are of school age, you also must have the permission of your child’s school and principal in order for them to leave school and work during school hours.

Every legal guideline must be followed meticulously because not only could it lead to large fines and penalties for the agency involved, but could also risk putting a child in an unsafe environment.

The occurrence of situations like this are almost non-existent, as child employment is a heavily regulated sector. Most brands these days will always go through a reputable agency to find talent and any reputable agency will not work with a non- reputable and law abiding client, so the risk of this is extremely minimal. As an agency we pride ourselves in ensuring we are doing everything we can in order to guarantee our kids are safe, wherever they are working.

While this may seem like a lot, it is essential as a parent whose child has an agent or as someone looking for talent management, that you are aware of what goes on. There is absolutely no need to worry as your agent has it covered, and they will send you all the necessary information you are legally required to have. However, if you do want to find out more, reach out to your agent so they can point you in the right direction.

At the end of the day being informed is necessary but you really have no need to stress. If your child is represented by a reputable agency they will be aware of all legal obligations and follow them methodically.

Bettina Stories; Vivienne

One of the wonderful things about the entertainment industry is that the possibilities are, quite literally, endless. There are no restrictions on success and it can be achieved at any age! Vivienne is the perfect example of this, having being only 5 years old when she scored a role in a Feature Film! Four callbacks over the span of a month and a role in the movie Little Monsters was hers, who knew decision making was so hard?!

Vivienne and mum Kathryn loved the whole experience and sat down with us to chat about it.

 

Vivienne

How long have you been with the agency?

Since I was, like five

 

What was your first job?

An ad for Aldi, I got to be hooked on a fridge

 

What was it like going to your first casting?

I was nervous. There were lots of other girls and I made friends with them while we waited.

 

How did you feel when you were told that you booked the job?

I felt really happy

 

How did you learn your lines?

They told me words to say, and then I had to say them in sentences.

 

What was the best part of working on set?

At the end, because I was so good I got a unicorn! Everyone is really nice and mum was right there.

 

What things did you find difficult or challenging on set?

I couldn’t like, get off the fridge for ages and it got a bit boring. On the film set, sometimes we were tired or bored and then I had to fake laugh.

 

How did you feel seeing yourself on TV for the first time?

It felt weird but it was really good.

 

What was it like working on the set of a feature film?

On the film set, the best parts were all the cool stuff I got to do, like going on a tractor and seeing animals. I made lots of friends. The grownups were really nice. I had to miss a lot of school which was good! I got to meet the person who did the voice of Olaf, and he did the Olaf voice for us. It was really fun.

Vivienne studying her script!

Kathryn

 

Why did you decide to join Vivienne up to an agency?

Vivienne was always adamant that she wanted to do modeling or acting. I was unsure but decided to check it out. I googled agencies and chose Bettina as they had good reviews and were close by. I thought it was a small outlay to give her a chance!

 

What was it like taking her to her first casting?

I was really nervous! When I saw the other kids I thought they all seemed really confident and quite different from Viv. Some seemed to know the casting agent, I thought she didn’t have a chance. It was hard sending her in by herself.

 

What is the best part of seeing Vivienne working on set?

Honestly, I’ve been so proud watching her working – and it is work- so hard. Even when she’s a little tired or bored, she knows this is what she wants and she keeps going. There are loads of breaks and if she ever needs some time, it’s always available.

 

What do you find challenging about having Vivienne working in the industry?

The hardest part has been juggling other family commitments.

 

What is it like seeing Vivienne on TV?

It was amazing! I loved seeing her up there. It was interesting to see the way it all came together after watching the ad being filmed. It looked great and she looked so comfortable.

 

What was it like working on the set of a feature film?

What can I say but WOW! I never ever thought I’d be eating lunch next to an Oscar-winning actress. It was quite surreal. Everyone is just lovely and by the end of the eight-week shoot, we felt like family. We had representatives from the children’s guardian come and talk to us, to make sure we were comfortable with the process. Because there were some scary elements, they made sure they introduced these to the kids really gently and anything scary they made sure they shot it from angles so the kids weren’t actually there. The amount of people involved was really astonishing, but the kids were always made to feel like royalty. Even the stars let the kids have first dibs at the lunch table. As parents, we were always really nearby and set up with monitors if we couldn’t directly see the children. There was a nurse on set and two dramaturgs who looked after the children and coached them. By the end, they were all true actors.

Watch here:

Bettina Stories; Tilly Bulle

Everyone’s motivation for joining this exciting industry is different, for some they simply want to see their name up in lights and their face on billboards around the country. For Tilly’s mum however, she just wanted to see her little girl get her confidence back. After attending many auditions and booking some amazing campaigns, Liz has seen her daughter come to life again and has been kind enough to share their story.

Tilly
How long have you been with the agency?
Almost 2 years
What was your first job?
Bulla – which was really funny as my last name is Bulle (said the same as Bulla)
What was it like going to your first casting?
It was scary but exciting at the same time and I had to eat meringue and crackers and sour cream
How did you feel when you were told that you booked the job?
I was in the car when Bianca rang Mum and it was on speakerphone and I cried because I was very very happy and shocked
How did you learn your lines?
My first lines I had to learn were for the Xbox One S commercial and Mum and I practiced them in the car
What was the best part of working on set?
I got to meet lots of new people
What things did you find difficult or challenging on set?
Getting to know everyone because I was shy at the start
How did you feel seeing yourself on TV for the first time?
Very very excited
Liz
Why did you decide to join Tilly up to an agency?
 
Because Tilly’s younger brother has Autism and for four years she spent the whole time waiting at Paediatrician or therapy appointments and the confident happy little girl was losing her confidence.  We had been told more than once that she was so photogenic and could be a model and one day I just googled child models and applied to Bettina after reading lots of reviews.  We had hesitation and received lots of comments about signing Tilly up initially but anyone who knows Tilly and our family see only the joy it brings.
What was it like taking her to her first casting?
I think I was more nervous than Tilly.  Thank goodness for the emails from Bettina especially the Castings Guides that tell you what to do, what to wear etc.  It is very strange as you are there only a few minutes and I don’t usually go in so have no idea what happens.  Tilly was very lucky in that she got the job on her first casting.  Now she just loves going to the castings and meeting people and having fun.
What is the best part of seeing Tilly working on set?
Seeing her come alive.  For all the stress we have sometimes getting there – either on time, or without spilling drinks down our white tshirts – it makes it all worthwhile seeing her having fun, doing what she loves and so naturally.
What do you find challenging about having Tilly working in the industry?
After Tilly’s Xbox commercial we received lots of media feedback about her being dressed up to look like a mini adult and wearing makeup which was hard to take as a parent and a little confronting and my instinct was to comment and protect her.  They seemed to miss the whole concept of the ad was to make her look like a mini adult.  However I’m glad that happened right at the beginning as it made us so much better at what we do, it made us realise that this is what happens when people judge someone without knowing and what celebrities go through all the time, that you need to be thick-skinned but with a smile and a wonderful heart.
What is it like seeing Tilly on TV?
It’s funny.  It’s still a bit surreal, even now.  Tilly’s Dad is worst he googles and YouTube for weeks searching for her commercials etc and he usually finds them first.  The longest wait was for the AHM Medibank ad which was played throughout the Big Bash when all Tilly’s friends parents were either calling or texting saying we’ve just seen Tilly on telly and we still hadn’t.  In the end we set the TV to record all night and ended up forwarding through the cricket and just watching the ads.  We always get great feedback from her friends and they say it’s so lovely and weird having Tilly on their TV in the front room with them.  But what I love best is how Tilly is just Tilly – there is no bragging or drama about her, it’s just her “job” and we are so lucky to have found her dreams early on and help her to realise them.

Watch their interview here:

Is Boutique really Better?

When looking for an agent for your child, you will probably come across a lot of contradicting information about what is and isn’t better for your child. One of the most common phrases you will come across, used to promote smaller agencies, is that they are ‘boutique’ and therefore able to offer a more personalised service because they only represent a small group of talent.

 

As one of the largest agencies in Australia, it would be remiss of us to gloss over the fact that this might sound as though we are trying to promote why we would be a better choice over a smaller agent. But bear with us, as there are some solid facts that you should consider when deciding what type of agent you go with.

 

First off, there is no real definition of a ‘boutique’ agency, so an agent could still have millions of children on their books a promote that they are ‘boutique’. There is no regulation on this and as such it is not a really a factor you can rely upon when making your decision.

 

When sourcing talent, clients like plenty of options to choose from. This gives them greater chance of finding the right talent they are looking for rather than trying to cast from limited options. They also prefer to source talent for multiple roles from one agent, as obviously this significantly cuts down on the administration time. If boutique agents really are boutique, then they would likely not have a healthy enough talent pool to provide clients with options and a range of choice like a larger talent agent can. This is why clients tend to go directly to larger agents for their campaigns, and as such larger agents end up with the most work for their talent because they are able to best service the industries clients.

 

But what about recruiting talent? Isn’t there a set criteria for what type of children will gain work in the industry, and as such only those that fit should be offered placement? Well, as agents, we know that sometimes the shiniest gems are hidden in the most unlikely places! So whilst we can be extremely picky and stick to a certain criteria when recruiting new talent, and as such limit our talent pool, we are aware that there is a plethora of work available to talent of all shapes, styles, looks and skills. We also know that sometimes children just need to be given a chance to develop and shine, and we love seeing new talent blossom from one opportunity to the next. The only criteria required to succeed in the industry is passion and patience!

 

One of the main fears among new talent and their parents is that they do not want to ‘compete’ with lots of other children for each job. This is typically what steers them towards smaller, boutique agencies. But the reality of the industry is that if you are right for the job, you will get it. It doesn’t matter if there are 5 or 500 other talent going for the same role, if you’re it, you’re it! What you really need is an agent that will expose you to the most opportunities possible, and that is what you will get at a larger agent. As explained before, because of their healthy and varied talent pool they are a one stop shop for clients and typically attract the most work. You will always be submitted for roles with other talent, whether they are from your agent or with other agencies. But with maximum exposure you will (hopefully) find the role that is perfect for you, irrelevant of how many other talent they had to choose from!

 

At the end of the day you need to find an agent that you feel comfortable with, but don’t be scared away from approaching larger agents and don’t be sucked in by common buzzwords. Only you can decide what is right for your child but if you are armed with the right knowledge and expectations you can rest assured that you will make the right decision.

Bettina Stories; Ava & Olivia Hosking

Anyone who works with toddlers will know that one is enough and two can be a nightmare! But Sammy has been making it work with her gorgeous twin girls over the last couple of years when they’ve been booked for some amazing campaigns. She chats to us about what it’s like having twin toddlers on set and also their experience working as a whole family for Elevit.

 

Why did you decide to join the girls up to an agency?

It sounded like a fun thing to try – The girls are identical twins and I had a lot of people saying they would be great.

 

What did you look for when deciding on an agency for the girls?

First they had to have a good reputation, some great opportunities for the kids and, of course a high standard professionalism – treating the children well.

 

What made you choose Bettina Management?

The great reputation, track record of amazing clients, word of mouth from others in the industry, and ease of communication.

 

What was it like taking them to their first casting?

So exciting, I was really happy to simply show my babies off – anything else was just a bonus

 

What is the best part of seeing the girls working on set?

Being with them and be able to ‘work’ as a new mum, it was a great thing to look forward to. It’s so much fun being on set, everyone always loves and takes such good care of the kids.

 

What do you find challenging about having the girls working in the industry?

The older the twins get, the harder it is to keep them under control!

 

What is it like seeing the girls on TV for the first time?

We especially love seeing the girls on TV and hearing when friends and family also see them – we have family in Adelaide and they are always delighted when they show up on the screen.

 

What is your favourite job that the girls has done?

They are all so fun, Elevit was so memorable as it was with all three of us and the girls were still such little babies. It was shot so beautifully and such an incredible experience.

 

Do you have any advice for parents with young babies wanting to get into the industry?

Just go for it, listen to what they have to say and don’t take it too seriously.

 

Watch their interview here >>

Bettina Stories; Aydin Chiem-Drumm

There’s nothing quite like seeing your little one on TV for the first time, and Aydin’s parents have been lucky enough to watch their son on their screens many times. We sat down with Aydin and his dad to have a chat about their experience so far.

 

Aydin

How long have you been with the agency?

2 years

What was your first job?

Royal Caribbean Cruises

What was it like going to your first casting?

Strange, but the people were nice – the director let me stand on his board room table .. I was like “wow”.

How did you feel when you were told that you booked the job?

*very* Happy –  I lost my first tooth 4 days before and I thought they would not want me.

What was the best part of working on set?

The Yummy food  

You got to go on a cruise for a job – can you tell us a bit about that?

I know .. my first cruise ever –it was sooo much fun. I got to go on the bumper cars, play on the X-box, go up in the sky view crane.  Awesome.

What things did you find difficult or challenging on set?

There was lots of waiting around and it gets boring.

How did you feel seeing yourself in a catalogue for the first time?

Weird .. but my family and friends loved it.

 

Albert

Why did you decide to join Aydin up to an agency?

I used to work in the industry, so I have some idea what to look for. Aydin is very mature for his age and takes direction very well. I figured he would be good at remembering scripts and has a very sociable personality.  He’s very easy on the eye as well .. that helps

What was it like taking him to his first casting?

A bit out of the ordinary, the advertising company was in a city tower. I wasn’t sure how Aydin would take it – but the staff were all wonderful and made him feel very comfortable.

What is the best part of seeing Aydin working on set?

How well he gets along with all the staff. They love his personality and he leaves his mark wherever he goes 

What was it like taking the whole family on a cruise for the shoot?

Well only his mother went – there was some debate over who should go .. actually, who am I kidding ..no debate really ..  Mum just decided. They had a wonderful time and I was extremely jealous!

What do you find challenging about having Aydin working in the industry?

Two things really .. firstly “getting” to the auditions especially in Sydney traffic – never fun!  And it can be disruptive. It is a commitment that all parties need to uphold. If your agent is putting you forward then you need to be sure you show up.

The other challenge is dealing with the reality that not every job is your job.  If you approach the process in the right way the industry can teach your child valuable life lessons.  Well .. that’s how we approach it.

What is it like seeing Aydin on TV?

It’s a very proud moment indeed.

 

Watch their interview here:

 

Bettina Stories; Ashley Kim

It’s not every day you get to jump aboard a cruise ship on an all expenses paid holiday! Little Ashley was lucky enough to be booked for client Royal Carribean Cruises, which meant her and her family were treated to the Royal treatment aboard their luxury cruiseliner, in exchange for a few hours of modelling work which saw Ashley featured in their international advertising brochures. We spoke to her and her sister, Jennifer, about their once in a lifetime experience!

 

Ashley

  1.     How long have you been with the agency?

2 years

 

  1.     What was your first job?

My first job was for Royal Carribean cruises.

 

  1.     What was it like going to your first casting?

I was nervous going to my first casting, but I had a great time and now I have improved and don’t feel so nervous anymore.

 

  1.     How did you feel when you were told that you booked the job?

I was so excited to be going on a holiday with my family.

 

  1.     What was the best part of working on set?

I love getting to see all parts of the cruise and playing in the water park.

 

  1.     You got to go on a cruise for a job – can you tell us a bit about that?

We got to see everything and did a bit a modelling for their pamphlets. It was really fun and I loved being on holiday with my family.

 

  1.     What things did you find difficult or challenging on set?

Sometimes I get a bit nervous, but I think I have improved a lot.

 

Jennifer

  1.     Why did you decide to join Aydin/Ashley up to an agency?

    We noticed that she was interested in modelling and having her photo taken, so we thought we should let her have a try.

 

  1.     What was it like taking her to her first casting?

It was nerve-racking for all of us but we were so proud of her.

 

  1.     What is the best part of seeing Ashley working on set?

Just seeing her having fun and doing something that she loves.

 

  1.     What was it like taking the whole family on a cruise for the shoot?

It was a great experience and we are very grateful for the opportunity.

 

  1.     What do you find challenging about having Ashley working in the industry?

It can be nerve-racking for the family and you don’t want her to be disappointed, but it always turns out great.

 

Watch here>>

Tell Me I’m Pretty

The beauty industry is thriving at the moment with perfectly painted faces becoming an increasingly popular trend. Cosmetic stores such as Mecca and Sephora are expanding on Australian shores, with the cosmetic industry expected to bring in $4 billion this financial year, and the beauty industry $4.9 billion.

Statistics time! In the US, studies indicate that 54% of girls aged 12 – 14 wear eye makeup and 45% wear foundation.  The studies also show that 80% of kids at the young ages of 9-11 use beauty and personal care products, with 42% using them because it provides a sense of confidence. While these stats can come as quite a shock, other research indicates that students who wear makeup achieve better grades in school, and it is all to do with the confidence that the makeup brings. The beauty products make the individual feel a sense of overall enhancement in their self-esteem, attitude and personality.

Social media beauty guru, Reuben De Maid (12 years old)

From an agency perspective, we believe in encouraging body confidence in a completely different way! We believe that kids should be kids, and our clients emulate that in their advertising. They are not looking for mini-adults, they want real kids. When children are called in for castings the rule of thumb is minimal to no make up with natural but neat hair.  So when a child books a job for the first time, it evokes a sense of joy and pride, knowing that they were chosen purely for just being them, rather than masking themselves behind a face of product. When the child is on set a makeup artist may do some touch ups using a small amount of makeup, but this should only enhance their natural features more. Here at Bettina Management we are firm on the idea that kids should act their age, as they have plenty of time to look like an adult later.

Anastasia Kingsworth

We can understand where the influencing is coming from, with young beauty bloggers popping up left right and center. Popular makeup artists such as Lauren Curtis, Shannon Harris (Shaaanxo), and Chloe Morello can sit pretty with a full-time career as a YouTube star with a combined following of over 10 million subscribers. Popular Youtube beauty guru, Reuben De Maid, has amassed a following of over 95,000 Youtube subscribers and 180,000 Instagram followers at just 12 years old. We also have Anastasia Kingsworth, 17 years old and 458,000 YouTube subscribers, and 10 year old Jack (makeupbyjack) with 467,000 followers on Instagram.

When it comes to letting your children wear makeup on a day to day basis it really does come down to personal preference. There are no studies to show that wearing makeup at a younger age affects your skin anymore than as an adult. So do we look at it as a confidence builder or a youth killer? Do we let our children wear makeup just because they want to or is that encouraging them to hide their insecurities rather than embrace their natural beauty? Regardless of your choice, at one stage or another you will have to accept that the use of beauty products is a sign that your child is growing up, and to not shame other parents for their choices in the process. From an agency point of view, despite the many misconceptions about children in the modeling industry, we do not encourage makeup, but what children do outside of this is not our place to say. It really does not and should not matter, in the wise words of Hollywood actress Tina Fey: “If you retain nothing else, always remember the most important rule of beauty, which is: who cares?”

Bettina Stories; Hanna Adams

Being a model as your first part-time job isn’t a typical pathway, but Hanna makes it work! As one of the few regular models of Cotton On’s teen label, Free by Cotton On, Hanna’s modeling career is taking off in front of our eyes.

Cameron, Hanna’s doting dad, has been on this journey with her every step of the way. We got the chance to speak to Hanna and Cameron about this experience and hear things from their perspective.

 

Age: 14 years old

Signed: 2017

Clients: Cotton On, Holden & Attitude Studios

 

Hanna

How long have you been with Bettina Management for?

I have been with Bettina for around 18 months

What was your first job?

It was a modeling job for Free by Cotton On

What was it like going to your first casting?

My first casting was a bit nerve-racking but it was very exciting and it went pretty quickly actually.

What has been your favourite job so far? Why?

My favourite job so far has been all my shoots for cotton on free, because I have a lot of fun doing them and they have a great crew and the other girls I do it with are amazing and really funny.

What’s the best part of working on set?

The best parts of working on set are that you just have a really good time with the people you’re doing it with and taking the photos reminds you that you’re going to be seen and it makes you really excited.

What did you find difficult on set?

The only things I found difficult were getting nervous that when all these people see your photo you get a thought about what they are going to say and their thoughts on you after they’ve seen them.

How did you feel seeing your photos online for the first time?

I was so excited and my hands were shaking and I was all tingly but I still got a bit shy every time someone wanted to look at it.

What things have you learnt from working in the modelling industry?

I have learnt how to walk properly on a runway and how to just relax when someone was taking a photo of me; I have also learnt how to deal with peoples thoughts on me and take them all positively.

What do your friends say when they see your photos?

They say they look so good and I’m really cute and I’m good at what I do.

What is your dream job?

My dream job is to become a Victoria’s Secret supermodel but still study biology, physiology and zoology on the side.

 

Cameron

Why did you decide to join Hanna up to an agency?

We decided to join Hanna up to an agency mostly to gain guidance and an experienced idea of how to proceed carefully with her career as a model.

What made you choose Bettina Management?

We have a friend of a friend who is a portrait photographer. We asked her who had a good reputation in the industry of child modelling and Bettina was their first choice.

What was it like taking Hanna to her first casting?

Very exciting for both of us. It was a very positive experience, the staff were very positive and enthusiastic.

What is the best part of seeing Hanna work on set?

By far the best part of seeing Hanna work on set is seeing how happy she is to be modelling, she’s smiling for the entire time.

What is it like seeing Hanna in print?

It was a little surreal at first but now it is quite normal. Seeing her in a shop window recently was especially exciting.

What do you find challenging about having Hanna work in the industry?

Probably the late notice of some castings that are held by the clients and also the repetitive paperwork involved.

In what ways has working in the industry impacted Hanna in her life?

Her self-confidence has grown immensely since her first job. I think she doubted her abilities at the start but she just gets in and gets the job done now. She listens much better to direction now than before.

Do you have any tips for new parents entering the industry?

Be patient, it doesn’t always happen overnight. Judging your child’s maturity is also important. It has to be the child that wants to do it.

How do you feel about the use of social media such as Instagram to promote Hanna as a model?

Hanna and Lukas have Instagram accounts for modelling. Neither of them have received work through social media but I think it is important to get their profile out there. I manage and have 100% control over their accounts.

 

Watch their interview here: