Talent Images – What To Do and What Not To Do

We are all guilty of having countless happy snaps of our little ones on our phones. When it comes to creating and maintaining your child’s talent profile, it can be difficult to choose only a handful of images that highlight your child’s unique look and personality. Your child’s talent profile is not just seen by our Castings Department. Our clients also regularly view your child’s profile to consider them for upcoming campaigns. We’re here to make sure that you’re keeping your child’s profile up to date while still keeping it appropriate for the industry. We had a chat with our National Casting Manager, Bianca Birnbaum, to give you an insight into how you should be running your child’s talent profile, and how you can benefit from putting these tips into practice.

A professional head shot suitable for your child’s talent profile

From a casting perspective, there are many ways to make your child stand out from the rest when being considered for a job. In Bianca’s opinion, a professional headshot is the best image to use as your child’s default image on their talent profile. “It is a quick and easy way for our clients to see exactly what your child looks like. “Once a client enters search criteria for their project a list of suitable profiles appears with smaller images.  If your child’s primary photo is too dark, too far away or difficult to see clients may skip past them”

“Clients want to see your child in their most natural form,” said Bianca, “They want to see how they can style your child to fit the requirements of their shoot.  Filters and black and white images are not necessary on your child’s profile.” These edited photos can hide your child’s physical characteristics including hair, eye and skin colour. The same goes for your child wearing sunglasses, hats or other items that hide your child’s features.

Clear, well-lit, recent images are always useful for your child’s profile

Instead of having extremely edited photos of your child as their default picture, consider how that can look from a client’s perspective. If they are wearing make-up and their skin has been airbrushed in every photo on their profile, according to Bianca, “you are not giving our clients a true representation of what your child looks like and you might actually be pushing them out of the running for a particular job.  Clients come to children’s agencies looking for talent who appear true to their age.  They want a 10-year-old that looks 10, for example, not 13.” These types of photos are great to have on their profile, just not as the first one the client sees. “Using the professional headshot as the default image shows the client your child’s natural look, as most shoots don’t require the kids to wear make-up anyway.” If your child initially appears to have the look required for a client’s project, they can click to open all images and see your child’s personality and versatility. 

When sending a pitch of talent to a client; clear, professional headshots are ideal

In Bianca’s experience as our National Casting Manager, if you don’t have natural photos readily available for clients to view on your child’s talent profile, “the clients will sometimes ask for more natural pictures and/or selfies of your child.” Clients may ask for these kinds of photographs, however not all bother to do so, so it doesn’t mean you can disregard the advice our experts say. It can waste a lot of time going back and forth between you as the parent, the casting department and the client that is hiring to obtain these more natural photos of your child before they are even booked for anything.

We understand that you want to use a photograph of your child that you have stored on your phone as it has cool lighting or amazing scenery, “they might be good for Facebook, but it doesn’t mean that it works for your child’s talent profile.” 

Our photographers work hard to capture the essence of your child’s charisma and produce an industry standard photo for you to use on their talent profile. These “plain” looking images may seem like your child won’t stand out but they serve to show our clients what they want to see, in a format that they prefer. We encourage you to use these professional headshots for your child’s page as it is a clean and good quality image taken with the correct lighting and equipment to highlight your child’s best features.

 

The What, How and Why of TFP

TFP (or time-for-print) is a term that is thrown around a lot in the entertainment & creative industries, it refers to arrangements often between photographers, stylists, hair and makeup artists and talent (models/actors), who exchange their time for good quality images to use in their portfolio, rather than for monetary compensation. In a true TFP shoot, no one involved will receive a commission or hourly rate.

As a parent, we know that your child’s wellbeing is paramount and that the idea of taking part in a TFP shoot with your up-and-coming little star may seem intimidating. But TFP work can be a wonderful opportunity! TFP shoots can be a great way to build your child’s portfolio and confidence in front of the camera, as well as build a network of valuable connections in the industry. Having said that, it is important to be selective with the TFP work you chose to take part in so that it truly benefits your child. It is one of the scariest things in the world to think your child may be taken advantage of, which is why we’ve created this simple list of “Dos” and “Don’ts” when it comes to TFP work for your child:

 

The Dos:                                                   

  • Be very clear with your expectations BEFORE agreeing to take part in the shoot.

Don’t assume anything. Make sure everyone involved is aware of your expectations by putting them in writing. When it comes to your child’s wellbeing it’s always best to have this in writing, rather than trying to arrange everything verbally.

 

  • Be a delight to work with

If everyone involved in the collaboration enjoys working with you and your child then, as well as building your child’s portfolio, you’ll also be building a professional reputation. We all know that positive word-of-mouth can be your biggest asset when trying to book jobs. Often times clients who book your child for a TFP shoot may go on to work on larger, commercial projects, so these connections can be invaluable.

 

  • Learn how to say NO

You should always be strategic with your child’s project choices. Never feel pressured to say yes just to be polite, if you don’t think the exchange will benefit your little star then don’t take part. Be selective and save your energy for the jobs that you and your child are truly passionate/excited about and that will add to your portfolio in a positive way. However, it is important to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible, as these building these experiences are what makes a great career.

 

  • Credit all involved when sharing TFP images

TFP shoots are all about experience and exposure, for all parties. Social media is a very powerful tool in the industry, so when sharing your child’s images on any platform, it is important to credit all people involved in the TFP shoot. This includes photographer/videographer, hair and makeup artist, stylist and agent.

 

The Don’ts:

  • Don’t cancel on short notice.

While your child is not getting paid, your professionalism is still on display and you have others that are counting on your involvement. Don’t commit to a TFP shoot unless you’re sure you can make it because if you pull out in the last minute you will likely jeopardise the whole shoot. It’s safe to say that those involved won’t be recommending you to any of their friends in the industry or wanting to work with you again if this happens. In the same light, if you are punctual and professional, you will be top of the list!

 

  • Don’t sell TFP images.

If you are presented with the opportunity to make money from the images you acquire from a TFP shoot make sure you get permission from everyone involved in the project and be prepared to share the profits.

 

Remember, when it comes to TFP work the experience and exposure your child can achieve by taking part can far outweigh the lack of compensation for that single project and can even result in a number of paid jobs! At Bettina Management we are here to help you every step of the way and want to see your child succeed just as much as you do. So don’t be afraid of TFP; think of it as an incredible opportunity that is a stepping-stone to getting your child the experience, exposure and connections required to thrive in the industry.

A Moment with our Casting Manager…..

Tell us a bit about yourself!

Hi everyone! My name is Kathleen, i’m a Melbourne girl and attended Monash University, completing in my degree in Communications and a Diploma in Languages, la bella vita! I have a little dog called Penny (see picture below!) who is the love of my life! In my spare time, I love to dance, go to the beach, ride my bike and love a good Neflix session….

 

Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 12.06.16 pmCan you tell us a bit about your background in the entertainment industry?

When I was younger I was in the Children’s Performing Company of Australia where I took singing, dancing and acting lessons. I’ve done some musical theatre and continue to dance to this day! I was also in a talent agency growing up, I was even the face of Primary School Wear! I was also in a short film that won an award at the Melbourne International Film Festival. More recently I worked as an event supervisor for The Entertainment Store, with clients such as Disney, Nickelodeon, Marvel, Cartoon Network etc.

 

What is your favourite part of your job?

The delight we get from seeing our little kids shine! Once our kids are finally confirmed for that big job, all the hard work is worth it.

 

What is your least favourite part of your job?

Paperwork! A necessary evil…….

 

What do you look for in potential talent?

Above anything else I look for a child with a great personality. There’s nothing better than seeing a child who is doing what they love and you can always see that when they get on camera.

 

What do think are the most important things to have in a talents portfolio?

Lots of photos! Not just your professional head shots, any natural shots showing your skills, personality and passions! A chat to camera is also really important, this allows us to see your personality and how you come across on camera. An outline of any skills you have, and what level you are at. Briefs are often very specific, we can’t often only submit kids who have specifically said they have certain skills. Up to date sizes and measurements, especially in kids as they are constantly growing.

 

Have you seen any changes in the industry recently?

There’s no such thing as a “typical” commercial look anymore, clients are looking more and more for a diverse range of talent, which we love!!

 

What advice would you give parents with children who have big dreams in the entertainment industry?
The industry is all about timing, you need to be ready as opportunities can come quickly and unexpectedly. Your time may not happen straight away but it may be just around the corner! You also need to work on any unique skills you may have, as this will make you stand out from the crowd. Always make sure your portfolio (whether it be AT2 or the likes) is full of material that allows clients to see your personality and unique skills. Videos (monologues, chat to camera, dancing, singing, anything!) as these will give you more opportunities to be recognised. Never give up! This industry is very unpredictable, but hang in there as your time may be just around the corner!

Show us your skills!

We have so many bright stars who work regularly for brands like Target, Kmart, Big W, Myer and many more. Modelling is a big part of what we do here at Bettina Management but even more so, we cast regularly for campaigns that require special skills or talents, these could be for roles in feature films, television commercials and even live stage shows.

But more often than not, we are unaware of our kiddies secret skills! So here’s a little bit of information on how you can show us your child’s skills and talents.

Special skills and/or talents could include: skate boarding, sporting abilities (soccer, basketball etc), dancing, singing, performance arts (juggling, acrobatics etc), accents or acting abilities, languages (other than English), musical abilities (playing an instrument) and many more!

AT2:

The Bettina Casting Department use AT2 every day to find and submit talent for briefs that come through from casting agents. We utilise all sections of the AT2 profiles to find suitable talent, this includes the skills section. This is why it is so important to keep your child’s profile up to date.

Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 4.05.31 pm

You will find the skills section at the top of your child’s profile, between “Comp Card” and “Audio”. Here you can update your child’s skills in any of the nine available sub-sections. These include Accents, Languages, Instrumental, Dance, Vocal, Circus, Sports, Performance Skills and Suggestions (this is where you can add skills that are not available in the other sections).

For each skill, you are able to select either “Basic”, “Good” or “Professional”. If we take basketball for an example, if your child has played basketball at school and would know the basic ins and outs of playing, this would be a “basic” skill. If your child has played basketball regularly for a number of years this would be a “good” skill. But if your child plays basketball on a team or has played for a majority of their life, this would be a “professional” skill.

Don’t forget to hit “save” at the bottom right hand  corner once you are finished.

Videos:

The perfect way to showcase your child’s talents is by uploading a little video to their AT2 profile. There is a maximum of 5 minutes of video available to all AT2 profiles, so keep this short and sweet!

Introduction:

A short introduction is best, just stating their name, age, their agency (Bettina Management), and a bit more about themselves! (how many people in are in their family, any pets, where they live etc etc)

Skills:

Next, we would love to see a short showcase of their skills, this can be just one or ten!  A little introduction is useful to let the audience know what the skill they will be performing is and perhaps how long they have been learning the skill. For example, if your child plays basketball, they can tell the audience about how long they have played, if they are a part of a team and even any awards they have won for basketball.

Then a 10 – 15 second demonstration of the skill, it is important to shoot a few takes so you get the best one!

Conclusion:

It is important to end your video with a conclusion, make sure to thank the audience for watching!

Here is a fantastic example of a skills video, by young Henry!

If you need any help with AT2, please refer to our Foolproof Guide to AT2 post!

Members are always welcome to contact us on 1300 888 611 or email us at info@bettina.com.au if they require any assistance.

Making the Most of ICast!

What is  ICast?

ICast is a function on AT2 which allows people working on Independent Projects, Short Films and Student Films to cast talent. They often have little or no budget so these briefs are more often than not for unpaid work. They may include a profit share/catering/travel fee for the artists involved. ICast briefs go to all members of AT2 who match the age-range, gender and location for roles being cast within the brief. However, you may, from time to time, receive briefs that are irrelevant to your child’s specifications.

AT2 & the ICast function are an additional component to your membership with Bettina Management.

You may receive messages in your Brief Inbox from non-paying clients, they will always stipulate ‘NON-PAID project’ on the ICast brief. These will be from AT2 (not us) and you need to contact the client directly for further information or apply for roles. For all paid work opportunities you will be contacted directly by the Bettina Office.

Once you receive an email notification from AT2 letting you know that you have received an ICast Brief, you need to either click the button in the email or go directly to http://www.at2casting.com.au  and login to your AT2 account. Once logged in, you’ll need to go to your AT2 inbox where you’ll find the brief and all the details you need. To respond and submit your interest, simply tick on one of the relevant role boxes and click the Submit button. You can submit to more than one role if there are multiple roles applicable to you. If you are not interested in submitting your interest, simply do not respond.

 

What happens after I have responded to an ICast brief?

Once you have submitted your interest by applying for a role within an ICast Brief, an email notification is sent to the ICast member who will login to their AT2 account to review your submission, look at your AT2 profile and decide if they would like to see you for an audition. They will contact you directly via email or phone or contact us (your agent) to organise a time and place. If you do not hear back from the ICast member, please assume you were unsuccessful in progressing further.

If you have any queries regarding the brief details, location or auditions, please contact the ICast member casting for the brief. You’ll find their contact email or phone number located within the brief in your AT2 inbox.

 

Who controls my ICast application?

As your agent, we work hard to get you paid work. Therefore, you have full control of the ICast function on AT2. If you are comfortable with your child doing unpaid work to gain experience then go for it!

Even though there is no payment involved, there are many benefits to participating in unpaid work:

  1. Experience and resume building
  2. Confidence building
  3. Attending auditions helps to practice and hone skills so you can nail it every time!
  4. Keepsakes in the forms of photographs, videos, music clips
  5. Bragging rights!

What happens after my child is cast in a role?

If your child has been booked then the client will communicate with you directly. However, we always welcome feedback and would love to hear if your child was cast for an unpaid job so we can give them a shout out on social media and add their experience to their profile!

 

Good Luck!

 

Here is a great example of some of our talent participating in an unpaid Short Film via ICast:

Preparing for Your First Audition!

You never know when you’re going to get the phone call informing you that your child has an audition but when it does come you want to be prepared. It’s not unusual in the industry to only get one or two days’ notice for an upcoming audition so the time to start practising is now! There are things you can do with your child that might help give them the edge they need to land the job.

Castings – Photo shoots

At a casting for a photo shoot your child will most likely be asked to try on some clothes and pose while having their photo taken. They might be given some direction on how to do this or they may just be asked to stand there while the photo is taken. The more relaxed and natural they look the better! A good way to practice this is by having a pretend casting session at home, have your child try on some different clothes and pose for you while you take the photos.

For inspiration you could also look at some models of a similar age in catalogues and have your child try out the poses they see there, but encourage them to be natural and do what they feel comfortable with. You might also give them directions to see if they can follow your instructions. Afterwards, you can look at the photos together and decide which ones look best and they can continue working on these poses.

You can also talk them through what they can expect on the day, and if you are unsure your agent is always there to have a chat.

Castings – Television Commercials (TVCs)

When it comes to television commercial castings there are a couple of areas you can focus on. Firstly, your child will usually have to introduce them self and say their name, age and agent while looking into the camera. You can practice this at home and watch it back, being comfortable and natural is what you are aiming for here, as well as showing a bit of personality.

Next, your child may be asked to improvise a short scenario based on the kind of thing they would be expected to do in the commercial and possibly say a line if the job requires it. You could watch some commercials on television or YouTube and act out some small scenarios to practice their acting skills. It could be as simple as opening a box and being excited when they see what is in there or telling them to pretend to call their nana and ask for a toy they really want. Another helpful exercise is to give them an emotion and ask them to act it out, for example happy, sad, surprised or angry. You could also give them a line and ask them to repeat it using these different emotions.

You can also work on a ‘chat to camera’. This is a short video in which the child looks into the camera and tells the ‘audience’ a bit about themselves, sometimes telling a story or talking about their past experience.

The final thing you might want to practice is a confident greeting and farewell from your child when meeting new people. Looking people in the eye and saying hello, thank you and goodbye are the kinds of things that will leave a great impression and help them later in life.

 

Hopefully now you’re armed with some tools and tricks to help your child through their first audition and hopefully that phone will be ringing with some amazing opportunities soon!

What Really Happens on Set?

Part 1: Preparing for the big day
 
Congratulations! Your child has finally gotten a job and now you need to know everything about your day on set so that it can be a wonderful experience for both of you.
Your agent will have confirmed the job and sent you a CALL SHEET as soon as it is available to them. Some productions are very busy and cannot confirm the details until late on the day before you are required on set, but be assured that your agent will send you the necessary information as soon as they receive it.
The most important details for you to take note of are;
  • your CALL TIME (the time you are required on set)
  • the exact LOCATION that you need to be at (sometimes this is a building address, but it could be a park or other public place)
  • the CONTACT PERSON you are required to meet on the day (eg. in the case of extras for a television show this would be the name and phone number of the 3rd AD). You will also be given details of anything you are required to bring with you and how long you are expected to be needed for.
Research the location you are required to be at before you have to leave home. Sometimes the call sheet will provide you with instructions regarding parking and other times you will need to figure it out yourself.
Productions are busy and very costly, so it is important that you arrive at the time you have been called for so not to delay the shoot time or halt production. Arriving 10-15 minutes early is appreciated, but do not show up any earlier than this. If you arrive too early at location, take the time to relax rather than turning up and risking being in the way before production is ready for you.
Spending time with your child onset can be a great experience, but arriving unprepared can add a lot of the wrong type of drama to the day. Make sure you have any paperwork or items you have been asked to bring, but don’t take it personally if they don’t use it on the day. It happens often that they ask for items or information, just to change what they originally planned on the day and not ask for it or use it at all.
Depending on the job, clothes will be provided while you may be asked to supply your own outfits at other times. If you are required to bring clothes the wardrobe department will inform you of what is needed; often simple things like jeans, t-shirts and runners. In general, choose items that do not have any visible branding and bring a few options of each. Bright colours are often appreciated, unless told otherwise and avoid stripes as these can often bleed together and not look good on camera. Bring as many options as you think will be helpful and remember you can ask our casting department if you are uncertain about anything!
Taking some snacks with you can also save the day. The break times for meals on set can vary a lot from your usual times so have something handy to keep your child (and you!) functioning if that is the case. Catering on sets can be amazing and might be one of the highlights of your day, but it is not guaranteed that your child will like what is provided. Some productions regularly cater for children and may have an array of choices for them while others are used to looking after their adult actors and crew and may not have the things your child prefers to eat.
It is also a good idea to take toys or games to keep your child occupied, as you could be required to wait for extended periods of time before or during filming. The idea is to provide them with enough stimulation to keep them occupied, but ready to work when they are called on set.
Now you’re ready to go!
 
Glossary:
CALL SHEET: a document that your agent will send you from the production company, usually on the day before your job. It specifies what time you are required on set, how long you are expected to be needed for, the location you are to meet at, the name and phone number of the person you need to meet on set (or contact if you have any problems on the day) and other details .
CALL TIME: the time at which you are required to be on set. Always arrive at the location earlier than this and aim to find the person you are required to meet with 10-15 minutes before your call time.
3rd AD: 3rd Assistant Director. This is the person who is usually in charge of the extras on a television set and who you would be required to report to if that was your role for the day. For other jobs you might be asked to report to someone with a different role.
 
What Really Happens On Set? Part 2, will explore what happens once you arrive on the big day

 

How to Help Your Agent Help You!

As a parent you play a vital role in your child’s career. It is important that you update all facets of your child’s AT2 profile on a regular basis so your agent can ensure the right information is passed on for all opportunities.
 
Time is of the essence in this industry with jobs turning over quickly, so the more progress updates the better!
We have put together a checklist for you to ensure you are on track and filling in your child’s AT2 profile in the best way possible.
NOTE: Your agent may have pre-filled in some of the below sections. 
1. ‘PROFILE’ section  
  • Select Ethnicity – this field is highly important. Note: you are able to tick more than one ethnicity.
  • Select Complexion.
  • Select Hair colour.
  • Select Hair Length – please update regularly in accordance with hair cuts.
  • Select Eye colour.
  • Away Status – when you are unavailable, such as going on a holiday, we recommend filling in this section so our casting department know when you can’t attend castings.
  • Measurements – Fill in ALL fields. Update measurements & sizes every 6 weeks if your child is under 3 years and as often as possible for all other ages.

For a detailed explanation of taking measurements and sizing we encourage you to read our previous blog ‘A Fool Proof Guide to AT2’ .

2. ‘PHOTOS’ section
  • You have 10 spaces on your profile to upload photos. These can be happy snaps from home, professional shots or skill related shots (eg; playing piano or dancing) and they can be taken on your phone.
  • You MUST be able to see their body and face clearly in the images.
For instructions on how to take great head and body shots check out our previous blog ‘How to take the perfect natural head and full body shot’ and for how to upload check out ‘A Fool Proof Guide to AT2’.
3. ‘RESUME’ section
  • It is a good idea to upload a resume containing name, education, list of jobs, castings and extra curricular activities/classes on your child’s profile.
  • If your child does not have vast experience a letter can also be great option and is a unique way to show off your child’s personality.
Check out the following example written by Luke as a guide. 
  • Ensure resumes and letters are updated regularly according to your child’s developments.
For detailed instructions on what to include and how to upload a resume check out our previous blog ‘A Fool Proof Guide to AT2 – Part 3’.
4. ‘SKILLS’ section
Ensure you have gone through all fields and inputted all of your child’s skills:
                 – Accents
                – Languages
                – Instrumental
                – Dance
                – Vocal
                – Circus
                – Sports
                – Performance Skills
  • It is vital that you fill out this section, clients often look for specific skills for a campaign, so the more they know the better!
5. ‘VIDEO’ section
  • We suggest that you record a chat to camera of your child and upload it to their profile. This will provide clients with an insight into your child’s personality and show off their ability in front of the camera.
If you require any help with any aspect of AT2 please contact Bettina HQ via the email address: info@bettina.com.au or call our office on 1300 888 611.
We are always happy to help 🙂

Different Types of Castings

In an effort to make the casting department and types of castings more transparent, here are some examples and definitions of different types of castings that your child could be asked to attend by a client.

General Casting: 
A general casting is often the most common. This is a casting where the client selects the children they would like to meet specifically by name. The scheduled times are booked prior and talent usually have about 5 minutes with the client. During this time, the client will take a quick snapshot of the child, follow by polite greetings (age depending).


Open Casting:  
1. Many of you may have seen our Facebook open casting calls. These call outs to our audience search for children in our online networks who are outside of our age brackets. For instance, from time to time, we receive requests for newborns or unique requests such as grandmothers who can juggle. When we can’t fill the brief ourselves, we put it out to our Bettina community to try and assist our client as best as possible, while giving others an exciting opportunity. You can learn more about Facebook open casting calls here.
2. There is also another type of open casting calls which are sometimes open to the public. There is usually an ‘open window’ of time in which talent can attend and meet with the client, however there is often long waiting time because the clients likely have not selected children by name so they can get very busy. On these occasions, we do try to weigh up the realistic benefit of you attending, although we ultimately leave the final decision up to you.

 

Audition: 
An audition is more of a complex casting that requires preparation before you attend. This means that the castings generally last longer, because talent will either have to learn a few lines or chat to camera so the director or client can gauge how the talent interacts and appears on camera, and possibly with other members of the cast. Although sometimes, we don’t receive anything – and this is most likely because the client will want your child to improvise when they arrive. In the case of us receiving audition prep, we will ensure you have all of the relevant scripts prior to your audition so you have ample time to practice!

Self-test audition: 
A self-test audition is when talent film their audition from home and send it to us. This form of auditioning is growing with popularity as it saves time and resources. You can get some tips from this post here.

Self Test Audition Help!

Do you know what a self-test audition tape is?

Recently we have had a few requests for talent to record their audition for us to send to the clients.

This is a growing request, particularly with the expansion of easy to use technologies. These requests have also been popular in states such as Western Australia and Queensland as cities are relatively more dispersed and driving time to a casting can take longer.

To ensure all of our talent have the best opportunity possible when requested to send a self-test audition tape, we have compiled a list of essential tips.

1. Film your audition on a plain background and ensure the actor is clearly visible.

2. Get a family member or friend involved to read the other part of the script- they don’t have to be a good actor, even if they simply say the words on the script it will bring the audition to life.

3. Be wary of background noises while making sure you are clearly audible. Even the slightest background noise such as muffling or distant voices can detract from the audition.

4. File must be in appropriate format: .mov .mp4 .m4v – you can convert a file to mp4 here simply by uploading your video.

5. Label your file – most casting directors will alert us to how they would like the file to be named, but if they don’t, ensure it is labelled with Name_Project_Role. A file named ‘12345audition.mp4’ has the capacity to get lost or to be discarded.

6. Shoot the audition in a medium close up, which means a shot from the actors shoulders up, followed by a long shot at the end where the actor must state their name, age and height to the camera.

7. Upload to a free video sharing site like Vimeo or Hightail. You can find easy to use instructions for these sites here and here. Then all you have to do is send us the link and cross your fingers!

The above points are a guide, remember we are here to offer advice and further tips during business hours if your child is requested to cast for a self-test audition. The casting director will also have specific requirements relevant to their processes which will need to be adhered to, these will be sent to you with your audition request!